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It wasn’t worth it — Why I’ll think twice about collaborating on a project

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It wasn’t worth it — Why I’ll think twice about collaborating on a project

About 9 months ago, I approached the leader of a geographically close volunteer group about collaborating on an event. I’m a volunteer leader with the equivalent group in the area where I live. It wasn’t surprising that I would have an idea (ideation is one of my 5 strengths from “Living Your Strengths”). I have lots of ideas, and they sometimes seem a little off the wall. While no one that we could identify had done an event like what I proposed, everyone we asked thought it sounded great. I started working on the project with the fellow volunteer leader and everything seemed to be going smoothly.

 

We put together a survey to gauge interest in various activities, and the event began to evolve. Then, it happened. . . the key activity that the other person was interested in spearheading, didn’t have significant interest based on the survey. In hindsight, that was the moment. The moment that my fellow volunteer, the co-chair of the event, pulled away and began having less input into the planning.

 

Throughout the planning process, this individual, while happy to give his input never had time to do the work. And, when given a specific lists of tasks to do, dropped the ball completely on all but one and only managed to do 50 percent of that item.

 

I’ve often heard comments from high school and college students about how much they hate working on group/team projects for the exact same issues… there’s always at least one person who doesn’t pull their weight.

 

So now, I’m at that point where I’m wondering what could I have done differently… are there things I can put into place to prevent similar issues in the future or do I walk away from collaboration all together.

Anne-Marie Farrow
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