cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Marketing is Not a Mystery… its An Important Process You Must Master

Contributing Solution Provider

Marketing is Not a Mystery… its An Important Process You Must Master

Follow My Friend Larry As He Travels the Path to Success.DirectMarketing.jpg

Marketing is not a mystery, it’s a process. If you randomly ask 100 people their definition of marketing, it’s highly likely you’ll get 100 different answers.

One thing for sure, without creativity, your marketing will never reach its full potential. In this digital age we work in every day, creativity is a major part of your marketing process.

 

Why is a marketing process so important?

Let’s start with the customer. A company promises to provide a product for a person to part ways with their money. Depending on the simplicity of the product, let’s say a donut or the complexity of the product, I’ll suggest an automobile, your marketing message may require a short or a long creative process.

When a purchase does occur, how good is your customer service? The simple answer is your customer service must meet the expectations of the buyer. If the donut was good, the establishment clean and the buyer received a big smile and a thank you from the server, the customer service was probably sufficient.

What about an automobile purchase? There are hundreds of buyer touch points and just one can derail a sale. Yes, the answers you need are quite daunting but that’s a big reason why your marketing process must meet all the needs of your customers. It's much more than dollars to donuts.

The list of marketing to-do’s can go on and on and for some, that’s a big problem. People cannot find the time to get it all done. If this is you, marketing will always remain a mystery until you find the time to determine the right solutions for your marketing process.

 

How to begin a marketing process.

Here’s a story how Larry shaped his marketing process from day one in a new company he started.

Larry started his new business with a product and service offering similar to the large company he left. His first problem was what type of marketing does he need to reach his potential customers? Larry could try and emulate the marketing programs his ex-employer had in place, but with Larry’s budget, that was out of the question.

After looking back at his previous job, his biggest success was working closely with customers. Larry developed a lot of good business relationships. Larry thought that was a good place to start building his marketing process and get answers.

Larry, considered hiring a sales person, but quickly realized he was the best man for the job. In fact, Larry thought if his relationship building skills he’d already honed from his previous employer worked as expected, it should set the foundation for the company’s future marketing and brand image.

 

Why was Larry’s selection the best choice for his marketing process?

Larry’s past success in the industry was a major influence on what his company would become for potential customers and prospects. By injecting what he learned from his previous customers into his company’s marketing process, the better likelihood his company would attract the attention of the ideal customer.

As Larry moved forward he used stories to differentiate his company from every potential competitor. After each encounter with a new business relationship he listed a few selling tactics he felt were valuable for attracting the right customers.

Some start-ups begin to fail at this juncture because they lost sight on what a good customer needs to solidify the feeling of making a good purchase. Somehow they lost sight of the prize. It could have been money, time, a wrong hire or poor marketing.

Larry used his experience to build a marketing process that lowered the potential for failure to build a foundation for marketing success. Without a marketing process in place, a company may use what finances established for marketing in the wrong way.

 

A Year Later…

Each customer story gave Larry more information to build his company marketing process. Even the business he did not get was useful in his evaluations, motivating him even more toward success.

The company website was designed to give educational information on product and service usage in exchange for capturing visitors contact information. Collecting data was an important tool in Larry’s marketing process.

Larry’s marketing team used web analytics to collect more information, such as what page was visited, how the visitor entered the website, and this data enabled the marketing people to make assumptions, which led to future relevant marketing content.

As time marched on, the marketing programs were always fined tuned. Some were changed based on what they learned from their latest customer data.

 

In conclusion…

Any company, either new or well-seasoned, can apply the same tactics to build a successful company. What you need to do is to change the way you are doing business. Here’s what Larry recommended:

  • Get closer to your customers.
  • Learn more about the competition.
  • Get a better understanding of your industry.
  • Hire competent, analytical people for your marketing team.
  • Be known for something you do very well.
  • Give people a reason why they should buy from you.

Here’s the secret, the one thing Larry learned from his past employer: Rome was not built in a day. Give your marketing process plenty of time to succeed and you’ll be rewarded.

Marketing-Tip_Crpd.png 

You may think your marketing is out of sight, but it may be out of mind.

 

Thanks for reading and please share with others – except your competition! It is truly appreciated.

 

Happy Holidays!

 

Mike Deuerling

Marketing Communications Group, Inc.

 

MCG.Banner.web.jpg

 

Constant Contact Solution Provider
Marketing Communications Specialist
www.marketingcommunicationsgroup.net
Need your marketing performance evaluated?

MD@DMCM.net
800-251-3608