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Marketing with Effective Email Design

Honored Contributor

Marketing with Effective Email Design

 Whats_the_best_font.jpg

                             

Come on, fess up, I know you've thought about it.  You don't have to be a font geek in order to design great looking email newsletters, but a basic understanding of the subject will go a long way in making your email pieces more easily read.

 

For starters, there are two main types of fonts. They are called SERIF and SANS SERIF

 

SANS SERIF vs. SERIF

 

The sans serif font renders a crisper, more streamlined appearance and is found in more online applications. When you're reading about something on Wikepedia, you are reading Arial

 

The serif font is usually found in books and newsprint. The font Times New Roman was designed for The New York Times back in the 30's and is the most widely printed font in the entire world.

 

It's perfectly fine to use either serif or sans serif in your email as long as your piece is readable by your user.

 

 

Using a little style


Another tool the email designer has at their disposal is type style. Here are examples of each, bold, italic, and underline in both serif and sans serif.

 

Let's use styles

Let's use styles


 

New guys on the block

 

VERDANA 

The computer has influenced many changes in type design. The two most popular additions as of late have been Verdana and Georgia. These are the equivalent of Arial and Times New Roman for the monitor generation.

 

GEORGIA

Georgia tends to be used less than the other three. It's my personal favorite for longer text passages while I tend to use Verdana for smaller spots like product description or pricing.

 

Summary

 

The four fonts that I described above are available on both the Windows and MacOS and as such guarantee that your email will be rendered as close to your design as intended. 

 

Now that you know a little bit more about font types I'd like for you to take a look around your world and see if you can tell what types and styles are used in different circumstances.  My next blog will cover other aspects of email design so stay tuned.

 

 

Tony Schaeferlogo250.gif

Clique Marketing and Consulting

www.cliquemarketing.biz