Ability to recall sent email

when might we see this ? This moring I just wanted to correct a link (moments after send, I of course discovered the error) but no can do without resending. THis would be so helpful, and (I don't think) not super challenging to implement.

 

IN THE MEANTIME, clear and accurate messaging is so appreciated. When I click on the "edit" button for a sent email, you say "you must first copy so as not to impact reporting" but that implies there might be a way to fix it without copying if you dont care about reporting, which is not true. Rather than send me down the rabbit hole that doesn't exist (and take the time of your chat support staff) just say "in order to edit a sent email you must first copy the email, then make any corrections and resend. Currently there is no way to edit the email you sent without resending." Thank you.

Top Answer
Kyle_R
Administrator

Hi folks - I appreciate all of the feedback around this idea over the years. We're updating the status of this to more accurately reflect where issues are in our pipeline. This particular idea has some technical limitations that prevent us from implementing it as people would like to see.

 

Generally speaking, email is unable to be recalled once it is sent. Email servers allow new mail to be received, but only the user or designated admin will have the ability to remove or replace mail once it is delivered to the recipient. One exception to this that people may be familiar with, would be some Outlook users who are on an Exchange type server in their workplace. These can be set up so that internal users can recall an unopened message sent to other internal users. This can only work if the emails are a part of the same organization or company.  

 

I've seen Gmail mentioned here as well. Gmail also doesn't have a recall feature, as I know it. They do offer an undo send feature, but it really just adds a time buffer before sending the email which will allow you to cancel before it goes out. Once it's sent, it's sent. This can be done in Constant Contact by scheduling the email for a later time. Before it's sent, you will have the ability to unschedule and return it to a draft status to make any further edits.


22 Comments
Kyle_R
Administrator
Status changed to: Not Currently Planned

Hi folks - I appreciate all of the feedback around this idea over the years. We're updating the status of this to more accurately reflect where issues are in our pipeline. This particular idea has some technical limitations that prevent us from implementing it as people would like to see.

 

Generally speaking, email is unable to be recalled once it is sent. Email servers allow new mail to be received, but only the user or designated admin will have the ability to remove or replace mail once it is delivered to the recipient. One exception to this that people may be familiar with, would be some Outlook users who are on an Exchange type server in their workplace. These can be set up so that internal users can recall an unopened message sent to other internal users. This can only work if the emails are a part of the same organization or company.  

 

I've seen Gmail mentioned here as well. Gmail also doesn't have a recall feature, as I know it. They do offer an undo send feature, but it really just adds a time buffer before sending the email which will allow you to cancel before it goes out. Once it's sent, it's sent. This can be done in Constant Contact by scheduling the email for a later time. Before it's sent, you will have the ability to unschedule and return it to a draft status to make any further edits.

AngelaA5962
Rookie

Users should have the ability to retract an email campaign, in case there is a major mistake on the email. Outlook allows you to do so. 

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