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Make Twitter Work for Your Business By Jennifer Spara

Occasional Contributor

Many small business owners hear about Twitter, maybe even have signed up for an account, but still question its value for their business. While Twitter may not be the top social networking tool for every business, it may still generate valuable leads and establish relationships that are advantageous for your business. Above all else, Twitter is a great place to connect and share information with customers, prospects and leaders in your industry. 

 

So, if you’re wondering how Twitter can be useful for your business, take a look at the five areas below. Chances are your business could benefit from using Twitter to reach out in one or more of these ways.

 

Marketing/Sales:

What to Tweet: Current or upcoming sales and promotions, new products or services, upcoming events

Tips: Track everything you can. Use coupon codes for your sales or promotions. Use a link-shortener like bit.ly to track click-throughs to your new products or services on your website.

Encourage your followers to RT or @mention you to their followers for a special offer.

 

Public Relations/Company Info:

What to Tweet: Company news, press releases, blog posts, press or media spotlights, behind the scenes or meet the staff, customer/client news or success stories

Tips: Mention people in your posts. If you tweet about how you helped a client or customer, @mention them in your post. Also if there are any news articles or stories about or featuring your company, @mention the newspaper or TV station where the story appeared, or the journalist who wrote the article.

 

Customer Service:

What to Tweet: Customer support, customer satisfaction and feedback, how-to’s, Q & A’s, product tips, FAQ’s, blog posts, helpful tips and tricks

Tips:  If a customer support issue becomes a back and forth conversation or requires specific customer information, make it private using the DM feature. This is also a great area to use content you already have. For example, share those FAQ or Product Tips on your website or the blog posts you wrote about how-to do something. It doesn’t have to be specifically about your products either. Expanding into general industry information will help you become a go-to place for support.

 

General Info:

What to Tweet: Industry news/articles, RT posts from industry experts, ask questions, request help/suggestions, personal info

Tips: Your tweets should reflect your company’s personality. Don’t be afraid to use your own voice. Sharing personal information or asking questions for help/suggestions can be a great way to engage with followers, but remember to use discretion.

 

Market/Competitor Research:

What to Tweet: Responses to any comments or tweets about your company, links to polls and surveys

Tips: Monitor conversation about your company, any competitor’s and your industry. Search for your brand/company name or product name using Twitter’s advanced search feature. (search.twitter.com/advanced) You can set specific keywords, location/radius and language preferences to get more specific results.

 

The goal is to tweet interesting, relevant information that will engage your followers and expand your reach. When you post photos, videos, quotes or Q&As, you’re more likely to be retweeted or to start a conversation. And once you start networking and building relationships using Twitter, you’ll see how it can easily bring value to your business.

 

BONUS: Tips on how to get more followers and find others to follow!

 

Get More Followers:

 - Post awesome tweets and get retweeted by posting sharable content – photos, videos, links, Q&As, and quotes.

 - Add your Twitter URL and links to your page everywhere: on and off-line, in your emails and newsletters, put a tweet button on your blog posts, and add a Twitter button to your website.

 - Engage with your followers:  respond to @mentions and reply’s, promote among current clients/customers, and have conversations with others.

 

Follow Others:

Strategic following – who you should follow:

 - Customers/clients, staff members, colleagues in the field, vendors, distributors, relevant journalists, social influencers, keynotes/thought-leaders, and even your competitors.

 

How to find users to follow – Twitter tools:

 - View suggestions – based on who you follow and who follows you

 - Browse interests – categories segmented by interest

 - Find friends – search your contacts for friends already on Twitter.

 

 

The Collin Small Business Development Center (SBDC) in Plano, Texas offers no cost, customized business consulting and training to help entrepreneurs grow successful businesses. Through the collaboration of the U.S. Small Business Administration, the State of Texas and Collin College, the Collin SBDC promotes business success by providing management education. We assist small businesses in creating jobs and economic growth by utilizing the elements of quality counseling and training, community involvement and the leveraging of resources.  

 

MartaF

Marta Gomez Frey leads a team of consultants at the Collin Small Business Development Center. Frey learned the ropes of running a small business working at her family’s engineering design firm. Frey’s father handled the technical projects, while Frey focused on the business aspects of the company. Having graduated from Texas A&M with a degree in history, Frey received her business education from on-the-job training and community resources. She sought help from places like the Small Business Development Center to assist her in developing the company. Over 12 years, she progressed from an entry-level project manager to a vice president. Frey’s work with the family business led her to volunteer with various small business and minority business organizations. These experiences brought her to the Collin Small Business Development Center, where she started as a part-time counselor in 2000. In 2002, Frey joined Southern Methodist University’s Cox School of Business as assistant director of the Caruth Institute of Entrepreneurship, continuing her role of consulting new and growing businesses in North Texas, and developing education and recognition programs dedicated to small business owners. She returned to the team at the Collin SBDC in 2006 as director. Frey is eager to help new and existing area businesses, as the center offers free one-on-one counseling, low-cost or no-cost training opportunities, and access to specialize free research vehicles. Frey and the team of more than 15 consultants offer expertise in a variety of industries and in topics ranging from marketing to taxes to franchising.

6 Comments
Occasional Visitor

Thank you for the help