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Bounce Rate, I would like to know which email no longer works so I can remove them

Occasional Contributor

Bounce Rate, I would like to know which email no longer works so I can remove them

Removing emails that no longer work is important because otherwise your number of contacts is very inaccurate. Do you have a system for deleting faulty emails so that the number of contacts on a contact list is representative to the number of real people that have the newsletter land in their inbox? I hope so as this seems very important. It is similar to sending a large group email from gmail and getting the automatic response that the email is not a real address etc. Then I would have to do delete those emails manually. However it seems like a smart idea for constant contact to have a way of doing this automatically. Thanks
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4 REPLIES 4
Honored Contributor

Re: Bounce Rate, I would like to know which email no longer works so I can remove them

Hello @DavidC1449

 

You can see the bounces that came back from your campaign by going to the Campaign Details and clicking on the number of bounces.  From here you can look at the different categories of bounces to see which ones you would like to remove from your account.  We typically recommend sending a couple of times to your list and then removing contacts who have bounced multiple times, just in case there was any issue with the receiving server that could have caused the bounce in error. We currently do not have an automated way that removes contacts from an account because we do not want to edit any of our customers lists.  To manage your bounces, you can select contacts and then choose the option to Remove Emails.  This will remove that email address from the account and not allow for it to be added back, as it would most likely bounce again.  

 

 

Occasional Contributor

Re: Bounce Rate, I would like to know which email no longer works so I can remove them

Thanks for the feedback Samantha. I will take a look at it and see what I can do as I know there were some old emails and I suspect there were 100+ faulty emails in that. Since we do a quartly newletter I guess I may not be sure which ones to remove for another 6 months or so.

Frequent Visitor

Bounce Reports

Need explanation of some of the bounce explanations: Blocked - server blocking? Suspended? Other?
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Moderator

Re: Bounce Reports

Hi @KimR8072

Happy to help! Here's a breakdown of each bounce type and any actions you should take.

 

Non-Existent- These bounces happen when the contact's Internet Service Provider says that an email address doesn't exist. If you double check that there's no typos or mistakes it is best to remove these addresses from your account.

 

Undeliverable- Think of this like a busy signal. Keep these addresses in your account until things are fixed or remove them if you won't want to wait. 

 

Suspended- This indicates the address has bounced before as non-existent. Constant Contact won't send to the addresses bouncing as suspended. If you are sure the address is valid you can call our delivery team for help.

 

Mailbox full- Not likely anymore but this can happen if an inbox is too full to get your emails! This contact may have a new/better address to send to.

 

Vacation/Auto Reply- Different type of bounce as the email is delivered but this indicates the reader has an out of office message turned on!

 

Other- The bounce message wasn't detailed enough for us to determine what caused the bounce. 

 

Blocked- When an email is blocked the ISP has decided not to deliver it, likely because it thought the email was spam. That could be because the ISP was concerned about something specific in the email or it rejects email from large senders. Go ahead and use the Spam Checker before you send your next email to reduce the chances of it being blocked because of content issues.

 

Hope that helps,

Hannah M.
Community and Social Media Support

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